Kierkegaard BELIEVED IN GOD

 

                                                                                                                                                                                               "The fact that God could create free beings vis--vis of Himself is the cross which philosophy could not carry, but remained hanging therefrom."
(Auden, 1966, 29)

"The human race ceased to fear God. Then came its punishment; it began to fear itself, began to cultivate the fantastic, and now it trembles before this creature of its own imagination."
(Ibid, 49)

"I love a father and a mother differently, and every distinct sort of love has its distinct expression, but there is also a love by which I love God, and there is only one word in the language which expresses it... it is repentance. When I do not love Him thus, I do not love Him absolutely, do not love Him with my inmost being, and every other sort of love for the absolute is a misunderstanding for when thought clings to the absolute with all its love, it is not the absolute I love, I do not love absolutely, for I love necessarily; as soon as I love freely and love God I repent. And if there might be any reason why the expression for my love of God is repentance, it would be because He has loved me first."
(Ibid, 81-82)

"For if God does not exist it would of course be impossible to prove it; and if He does exist it would be folly to attempt it."
(Ibid, 141)

"But between God and His works there exists an absolute relationship;...The works of God are such that only God can perform them."
(Ibid, 143)

"The despairer understands that it is weakness to take the earthly so much at heart , that it is weakness to despair. But, then, instead of veering sharply away from despair to faith, humbling himself before God for his weakness, he is more deeply absorbed in despair and despairs over his weakness."
(Ibid, 148)

" For in order to pray there must be a God, there must be a self plus possibility, or a self and possibility, or a self and possibility in the pregnant sense; for God is that all things are possible, and that all things are possible is God; and only the man whose being has been so shaken that he became spirit by understanding that all things are possible, only he has had dealings with God. The fact that God's will is the possible makes it possible to pray; if God's will is only the necessary, man is essentially as speechless as the brutes."
(Ibid, 151)

"Perfect love means to love the one through whom one became unhappy. But no man has the right to demand to be thus loved. God can demand it; that is infinite majesty. And it is true of the man of religion, in the strictest sense of the word, that in loving God he is loving him through whom he became unhappy, humanly speaking, for this life-although blessed."
(Ibid, 201)

PRAYER

"O Thou who art unchangeable, whom nothing changes! Thou who art unchangeable in love, precisely for our welfare not submitting to any change: may we too will our welfare, submitting ourselves to the discipline of Thy unchangeableness, so that we may, in unconditional obedience, find our rest and remain at rest in thy unchangeableness. Thou art not like a man; if he is to preserve only some degree of constancy he must not permit himself too much to be moved, nor by too many things. Thou on the contrary art moved, and moved in infinite love, by all things. Even that which we human beings call an insignificant trifle, and pass by unmoved, the need of a sparrow, even this moves Thee, O Infinite Love! But nothing changes Thee, O Thou who art unchangeable! O Thou who is infinite love dost submit to be moved, may this our prayer also move Thee to add Thy blessing, in order that there may be wrought such a change in him who prays as to bring him into conformity with Thy unchangeable will, Thou who art unchangeable!"  (Ibid, 224-225)

 

FREE LITERATURE

Does God Exist?
 

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